LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR CURRENT IMPACT GRANTS
tanzania
NORTHERN TANZANIA
An estimated 8,200 women and girls die in Tanzania each year from pregnancy and childbirth-related complications. Clinics often lack reliable electricity and adequate supplies, and health workers may lack the proper training – all of which limits their ability to provide quality maternal health services.

Lifetime risk of dying from pregnancy or childbirth related causes: 1 in 45

We Care Solar, Ujenzi Trust & Foundation for African Medicine & Education
(FAME)
Providing 50 rural health centers with solar powered electricity, raining health workers to prevent deaths and disabilities from postpartum hemorrhage, and supporting FAME Hospital’s provision of comprehensive pregnancy care and safe delivery, patient education and healthcare worker training.
GRANT AMOUNT
We Care Solar
$151,825 (2015)
Ujenzi Trust
$77,500 (2015)
FAME
$149,450 (2015)
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BACKGROUND
Tanzania has a shortage of trained healthcare workers, and many health facilities lack the proper equipment and supplies, including reliable electricity, needed to provide quality obstetric care. Every Mother Counts supports three groups working to prevent maternal deaths and disabilities in northern Tanzania - We Care Solar, Ujenzi Trust, and FAME. We Care Solar’s installation of Solar Suitcases in50 health centers in Sengerema, Shinyanga and Arusha provides reliable electricity, including lights for nighttime deliveries, outlets for charging medical devices and mobile phones to strengthen referral networks, and a fetal Doppler. Ujenzi Trust is training health workers to eliminate maternal deaths, emergency hysterectomies, and disability from uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage, and FAME is providing high-quality pregnancy care, labor and delivery services and emergency obstetric care, training of healthcare workers, and critical health education for patients and families in Karatu.
GRANT IMPACT

Number of Lives Impacted

6,976

  • 396 mothers and babies have received skilled care.
  • 1,530 mothers and babies have benefitted from Solar Suitcases in health facilities.
  • 50 health workers have been trained or supported in their work providing maternal and newborn care.
  • 5,000 community members have been educated on maternal and newborn health.
UPDATES
February 20, 2015
FAME on, “Friday Night Lights”
February 18, 2015
Announcing Our First Grant in Tanzania
VISIT OUR BLOG TO READ ALL THE UPDATES ON THIS GRANT

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grand_haiti_2
CENTRAL HAITI
75% of mothers in Haiti
give birth at home without
a skilled birth attendant
or access to emergency obstetric care.

Lifetime risk of dying
from pregnancy or
childbirth related
causes: 1 in 90

Midwives for Haiti
Training new skilled birth attendants, and supporting comprehensive maternal health care at a rural community clinic and emergency transfers to a referral hospital.
GRANT AMOUNT
Midwives For Haiti
$54,000 (2012)
$135,402 (2014)
$147,800 (2015)
LEARN MORE
BACKGROUND
Every Mother Counts is working with Midwives For Haiti to increase the quality of and access to skilled delivery care in Haiti. We are supporting the training of skilled birth attendants and supporting the development and operation of a community clinic providing comprehensive maternal health care and delivery services, as well as emergency transport to a referral hospital for women who need it.
GRANT IMPACT

Number Of Lives Impacted

25,574

  • 691 health workers have been trained or supported in their work providing maternal and newborn care.
  • Trained health workers have provided skilled care to 24,814 mothers and babies.
  • 91 workers have been supported in their work providing training or other services through the grant.
UPDATES
January 13, 2015
Post-Graduation, Juslène Regulus talks being a Midwife in Haiti
October 2, 2014
This is what it looks like to knock down a barrier in global maternal health
August 20, 2014
From the Field: With Partners in Health
August 15, 2014
Trainings for Nurses Will Save Lives Across Haiti
July 18, 2014
Judith Michel – Part 3
CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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emc-delhi-assam-india
DELHI & ASSAM, INDIA
45,000 women die from pregnancy and childbirth related causes every year in India, accounting for nearly 15% of all maternal deaths globally - more than any other country. Historical discrimination against women, particularly poor women from lower castes and tribal populations, drive India’s high rate of maternal deaths.

Lifetime risk of dying
from pregnancy or
childbirth related
causes: 1 in 220

NAZDEEK
Training activists & lawyers to document maternal health rights violations & secure legal judgments mandating better healthcare for mothers.
GRANT AMOUNT
$40,079 (2014)
$49,925 (2015)
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    BACKGROUND
    In spite of laws that mandate free care for all pregnant and lactating women in India, they are routinely refused care at health facilities, or receive substandard care and cruel treatment from health workers. In 2010, Nazdeek’s principals sued the government on behalf of women who were denied care at health facilities while in labor, and won, leading to increased monitoring and reporting of facility violations, victim compensation, and shelter homes for homeless pregnant/nursing women. With EMC support, Nazdeek is training lawyers and activists in India to document systematic maternal health violations and file strategic lawsuits against the government for failing to ensure access to care. The goal is to win court-ordered improvements in service delivery at health facilities.
    READ MORE
    GRANT IMPACT

    Number Of Lives Impacted

    2,924

    • 199 activists, lawyers, health workers and community members trained and educated on demanding and ensuring quality healthcare for pregnant and breastfeeding women and their children.
    • 2,725 women and children received improved nutrition and healthcare services to-date.
    • 15 trainers have been engaged in the work.
    UPDATES
    December 4, 2014
    Mothers in India – How Legal Education Can Save Mothers’ Lives
    May 21, 2013
    Nazdeek – Taking Maternal Mortality To Court
    CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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    grand_florida_1
    FLORIDA, USA
    The U.S. ranks 46th in the world in terms of maternal health. With 1 in 5 women of reproductive age lacking health insurance, too many women are not accessing quality prenatal care or education.

    Lifetime risk of dying
    from pregnancy or
    childbirth related
    causes: 1 in 3,800

    Commonsense Childbirth
    Providing pre- and postnatal care and education for low-income, at-risk mothers in central Florida, and expanding this model of care to other cities in the U.S.
    GRANT AMOUNT
    $63,000 (2013)
    $127,400 (2014)
    140,000 (2015)
    LEARN MORE
    BACKGROUND
    Maternal mortality rates in the U.S. have been on the rise over the last 25 years, with over 550 deaths each year. African American women are four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. Through EMC’s support, women who most need it have access to early, quality prenatal care and personalized education on nutrition, healthy pregnancy, breastfeeding, and newborn care.
    GRANT IMPACT

    Number Of Lives Impacted

    715

    • 715 women and their babies have benefitted from high-quality prenatal care visits and education on nutrition, healthy pregnancy, and breastfeeding.
    UPDATES
    September 15, 2014
    In Photos: Improving Maternal Health in Orlando, FL
    August 21, 2014
    Sneaking in Education
    March 11, 2014
    The Power of Education in Keeping Birth Safe
    January 27, 2014
    Announcing the arrival of a new service at Commonsense Childbirth Inc.
    December 19, 2013
    Choices In Childbirth
    CHECK OUT OUR BLOG

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    grand_uganda
    KABAROLE, KAMWENGE & KYENJOJO DISTRICTS, UGANDA
    On average, women in rural Uganda have to travel at least 13km to reach the nearest public health facility and often must do so by foot. If emergency care is needed, the distances are often longer.

    Lifetime risk of dying
    from pregnancy or
    childbirth related
    causes: 1 in 47

    BAYLOR CHILDREN'S
    FOUNDATION - UGANDA
    Providing transportation vouchers to pregnant women, enabling them to get to a clinic for the full course of prenatal care, safe delivery, and follow-up visit.

    Since 2012, Baylor Uganda, with EMC's support, has helped over 85,000 mothers and babies reach skilled care.
    GRANT AMOUNT
    $41,146 (2012)
    $79,755 (2013)
    $422,520 (2014)
    $520,375 (2015)
    LEARN MORE
    BACKGROUND
    The distance to a health facility and lack of transportation prevent many women from reaching a skilled birth attendant who can manage a normal delivery. She faces a similar problem if she requires emergency care facilities, which are even fewer and therefore even more difficult to reach. In western Uganda, where this grant is focused, only 14 percent of the population has access to free government-provided basic care in their community, and less than one percent of the population has a government hospital able to provide emergency obstetric care in their community. Women can now purchase inexpensive vouchers that can be redeemed with a local “boda boda” driver (motorcycle taxis) for a ride to the nearest provider for delivery and for a postpartum care visit.
    READ MORE
    GRANT IMPACT

    Number Of Lives Impacted

    80,823

    • 79,205 women and their babies have benefitted from an EMC voucher providing rides to a health facility for pre- and postnatal visits and safe delivery with access to emergency care.
    • 1,318 moms have received “mama kits” to incentivize and facilitate a safe delivery at a health facility.
    • 300 boda taxi riders have benefitted from the program, including training on transporting pregnant women and assisting them in an emergency.
    • This investment also supports the goals of the Saving Mothers, Giving Life initiative in Uganda, of which Every Mother Counts is a founding partner. In its first year, maternal deaths went down by 30% in the four districts in Uganda where SMGL was working.
    UPDATES
    November 18, 2014
    Your Gifts, Our Gratitude
    October 23, 2014
    For Me, Giving Birth Must be at the Health Facility
    October 17, 2014
    Going The Distance In Uganda
    July 2, 2014
    An Update from Uganda
    March 13, 2014
    The Life of a Boda Boda Rider
    CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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    emc-new-york-usa
    COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
    DESPITE GAINS IN RECENT DECADES, OVER 5,500 WOMEN AND GIRLS DIE EVERY YEAR FROM PREGNANCY-RELATED COMPLICATIONS. COX’S BAZAR, A RURAL REGION IN THE SOUTH, HAS ONE OF THE HIGHEST MATERNAL DEATH AND DISABILITY RATES IN THE COUNTRY. THERE IS A LACK OF HEALTHCARE FACILITIES AND THE COUNTRY SUFFERS FROM A SHORTAGE OF SKILLED BIRTH ATTENDANTS, PARTICULARLY IN THE RURAL AREAS. BETWEEN 70% AND 90% OF WOMEN GIVE BIRTH AT HOME WITHOUT A TRAINED BIRTH ATTENDANT OR ACCESS TO EMERGENCY CARE.

    Lifetime risk of dying
    from pregnancy or
    childbirth related
    causes: 1 in 240

    HOPE FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN & CHILDREN OF BANGLADESH
    Providing 1,000 women with the full range of pregnancy care, including access to emergency care, education on safe pregnancy, and linking traditional birth attendants with skilled providers and giving them the tools to safely identify and prevent complications.
    GRANT AMOUNT
    $74,750 (2015)
    LEARN MORE
      BACKGROUND
      Bangladesh still has one of the highest rates of maternal deaths in the world, with 176 deaths for every 100,000 live births. In rural Cox’s Bazar, over half of women do not have access to facilities during pregnancy. Nearly 90% give birth without skilled care, and only 11% of mothers receive postnatal care. EMC supports HOPE Foundation’s provision of comprehensive pregnancy and postnatal care, facility delivery for high-risk pregnancies, and newborn care, linking traditional midwives with skilled workers, providing them with and training them on the use of clean birth kits and postpartum hemorrhage mats, along with community and patient education.
      READ MORE
      GRANT IMPACT

      Number Of Lives Impacted

      CHECK BACK SOON FOR UPDATES

      CHECK BACK SOON FOR UPDATES
      emc-syria
      SYRIA
      PRIOR TO THE CONFLICT THAT BEGAN IN 2011, SYRIA WAS A MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRY WITH A LOWERING RATE OF PREGNANCY-RELATED DEATHS. SINCE THEN, HEALTH SYSTEMS HAVE BEEN SYSTEMATICALLY TARGETED AND DISMANTLED AND THE RATE HAS BEEN ON THE RISE. THE LATEST FIGURES ESTIMATE SYRIA’S MMR AT 68, BUT IT IS LIKELY HIGHER. 60 % OF MATERNAL DEATHS TAKE PLACE IN COUNTRIES EXPERIENCING A CRISIS OR CONFLICT, WHERE THE RISK OF DYING A MATERNAL DEATH IS 1 IN 54.

      Lifetime risk of dying from pregnancy or childbirth related causes: 1 in 400

      CIRCLE OF HEALTH INTERNATIONAL
      EMC is supporting COHI to recruit and train 6 professional Syrian midwives to provide emergency obstetric and trauma-based care; and equipping them with phones, professional bags, home visit kits and other tools, as well as providing critical supplies and medicines for safe pregnancy and delivery inside Syria.
      GRANT AMOUNT
      $40,350 (2015)
      LEARN MORE
        BACKGROUND
        More than half of all Syrians have had to flee their homes because of the conflict there – 75% of Syria’s people have been directly impacted by the conflict. Health workers, medical staff and patients have been systematically targeted and attacked en route to or inside medical facilities. Syria’s few remaining facilities struggle to cope with the large number of patients who need treatment. Barriers to care include the danger involved in seeking it and a shortage of those who can provide it. Supplies and medicines are in short supply. Maternal, infant, and child mortality are rising, though exact numbers are unknown. An estimated 200,000+ women will be pregnant in Syria in the next 12 months. Midwives, who typically do not provide surgical or emergency obstetric care, are being called on to do so.
        READ MORE
        GRANT IMPACT

        Number Of Lives Impacted

        CHECK BACK SOON FOR UPDATES

        CHECK BACK SOON FOR UPDATES
        guatemala_2
        GUATEMALA CITY, GUATEMALA
        Most women dying from pregnancy-related causes in Guatemala live in impoverished, often isolated indigenous communities. Gender inequality, poverty, and discrimination toward poor, indigenous women contribute to preventing many women and girls from accessing quality care. Postpartum hemorrhage immediately following birth is the most common cause of death. In the rural areas, 62% of women give birth at home without skilled care. At the same time, traditional birth attendants in the rural areas are trusted sources of information and support, using centuries-old traditions of postpartum sweat baths and medicinal herbs. They offer a bridge to the community.

        Lifetime risk of dying from pregnancy or childbirth related causes: 1 in 330

        ASOCIACIÓN CORAZÓN DEL AGUA
        Training indigenous students from rural areas to become professional midwives in a university degree program using a culturally relevant approach.
        GRANT AMOUNT
        $90,000 (2016)
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        BACKGROUND
        EMC’s support of Asociación Corazón del Agua will provide partial scholarships for 15 young indigenous women from rural communities, to train as midwives in a 3-year program that incorporates indigenous traditions of caring for women. Students must be sponsored by a traditional birth attendant in her community who she can work with to see patients during academic breaks and share knowledge with. Graduates from Asociación Corazón del Agua’s accredited program will receive a university degree from Galileo University in Guatemala City, the first professional midwifery degree of its kind in Guatemala.
        GRANT IMPACT

        Number Of Lives Impacted

        CHECK BACK SOON FOR UPDATES

        LEARN ABOUT OUR COMPLETED GRANTS
        grand_malawi_1
        RURAL MALAWI
        25% of health centers in Malawi have no access
        to electricity

        Lifetime risk of dying
        from pregnancy or
        childbirth related
        causes: 1 in 36

        We Care Solar
        Installing “solar suitcases”—portable solar power sources—in 40 rural clinics, to provide much-needed electricity to health centers in Malawi.
        GRANT AMOUNT
        $113,740 (2013)
        LEARN MORE
        BACKGROUND
        Like many African countries, rural Malawi struggles to provide reliable electricity, which poses special challenges to rural health clinics. We Care Solar’s innovative “solar suitcases” help leapfrog the traditional infrastructure constraints. These portable cases connect to solar paneling and can be used to provide light while also charging cell phones and other basic instruments such as fetal Dopplers and headlamps. Every Mother Counts is helping to equip 40 rural clinics with these suitcases in 2014.
        GRANT IMPACT

        Number Of Lives Impacted

        76,482

        • 40 rural clinics have been outfitted with Solar Suitcases, equipped with fetal monitors that provide long-term high-efficiency LED lighting, a universal mobile phone charger, headlamp, a battery charger, and outlets to charge essential medical equipment; computers, and mobile phones.
        • 76,402 moms and their babies have benefitted from solar power at the clinic during delivery.
        • 80 health workers have been trained on the use of a fetal doppler and are better able to accurately monitor fetal heart rates to identify complications early and to identify and manage complications during delivery thanks to solar-powered electricity, particularly at night.
        UPDATES
        September 12, 2014
        Solar Suitcases: Making Pregnancy & Childbirth Safer in Malawi
        July 10, 2014
        James’ Electricity
        May 5, 2014
        Watch The Film: Seda’s Light
        February 27, 2014
        Shining a light in Malawi
        November 8, 2013
        Big News: Announcing Our New Grant for We Care Solar
        CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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        grand_bali_1
        Bali, Indonesia
        Indirect causes like anemia, malaria, hepatitis, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS account for approximately 25% of maternal deaths in Asia.

        Lifetime risk of dying
        from pregnancy or
        childbirth related
        causes: 1 in 210

        Bumi Sehat
        Establishing a laboratory to
        diagnose and treat indirect
        causes of maternal death.
        GRANT AMOUNT
        $49,950 (2013)
        LEARN MORE
        BACKGROUND
        We were contacted by midwife Robin Lim in 2013 after she and her staff were exposed to HIV/AIDS because they had no way of knowing a mother’s status. This grant will ensure that providers know the health risks of mothers before they deliver so that appropriate care can be delivered and indirect causes of maternal death can be prevented.
        GRANT IMPACT

        Number Of Lives Impacted

        12,639

        • Provided voluntary HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) counseling, testing and treatment to women seen at the clinic.
        • Provided antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to HIV+ mothers and prevented cases of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV.
        • Conducted complete blood testing of all pregnant women seen in order to diagnose and treat conditions that contribute to maternal and infant mortality, including anemia, malaria, syphilis, cervical cancer, hepatitis, dengue and typhoid.
        • Provided nutrition education for pregnant women at the clinic.
        • Held community education sessions to ease the stigma and thus the spread of HIV/STI infections.
        UPDATES
        July 15, 2014
        A Photo Essay from Indonesia
        March 12, 2014
        Why National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day Matters to Maternal Health
        January 12, 2014
        Tales from the field: Sanur
        December 2, 2013
        Announcing a new grant in honor of World Aids Day
        March 14, 2013
        Touched by HIV/AIDS – When healthcare workers are exposed
        CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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        emc-kinshasa-democratic-republic-of-congo
        KINSHASA, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO (DRC)
        The DRC has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world – an average of 730 deaths per 100,000 live births. Chronic shortages of medical supplies and equipment contribute to the problem. Health facilities lack things like surgical instruments and even beds for moms to deliver in and rest on.

        Lifetime risk of dying
        from pregnancy or
        childbirth related
        causes: 1 in 23

        DÉPARTEMENT DE SANTÉ DE COMMUNAUTÉ PRESBYTÉRIENNE DE KINSHASA
        Providing community clinics with emergency obstetric care supplies, delivery and postpartum beds, and an incinerator for medical waste.
        GRANT AMOUNT
        $10,000 (2014)
        LEARN MORE
          BACKGROUND
          The Département de Santé de Communauté Presbytérienne de Kinshasa (DPS/CPK) clinics are located in the poorest parts of Kinshasa. Families live in extreme poverty, and resources are scarce: many women are forced to deliver their babies on the floor for lack of beds. Health workers must perform c-sections without complete surgical instrument sets and reuse instruments from other procedures - posing risk of deadly infection. And clinics operate without an incinerator for safe disposal of medical waste, which can lead to human illness and disease. EMC's support has provided six DPS/CPK clinics each with a complete new Cesarean-section instrument set; seven DPS/CPK clinics with vinyl-covered mattresses for delivery and postpartum beds; and one clinic with an incinerator.
          GRANT IMPACT

          Number Of Lives Impacted

          5,437

          • 5,422 moms and babies have benefitted from facility improvements and access to emergency care at 7 clinics.
          • 15 health workers impacted by new c-section kits, beds and an incinerator in their health facilities.
          UPDATES
          September 24, 2014
          The Mothers at Kinshasa Maternity Clinics
          CHECK OUT OUR BLOG

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          emc-new-york-usa
          NEW YORK, USA
          Maternal health in New York City is among the worst in the nation. Low-income women of color are disproportionately impacted. Preexisting health conditions coupled with sub-standard care, unnecessary interventions, discrimination and voicelessness results in many pregnant women not seeking or receiving the care and resources they need.

          Lifetime risk of dying
          from pregnancy or
          childbirth related
          causes: 1 in 1,800

          ANCIENT SONG
          DOULA SERVICES
          Providing comprehensive doula care, nutrition classes and group support to low-income at-risk women of color, and conducting community doula training.
          GRANT AMOUNT
          $154,649 (2014)
          LEARN MORE
            BACKGROUND
            African American women in NYC are over seven times more likely to suffer a maternal death as white women, and Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander women more than twice as likely. Nearly 8 in 10 maternal deaths in NYC are to women who gave birth by cesarean, and about half of these women were classified as obese. A 2014 American College of Obstetrics & Gynecology report stated that one of the most effective tools to improve delivery outcomes and reduce c-sections is the presence of continuous support, like a doula, during labor & delivery. Doula care has been shown to improve medical outcomes, control costs, and reduce health disparities. Comprehensive, community-based doula care coupled with nutrition education, group support and resources can give a voice to and empower low-income pregnant women of color and lead to healthier pregnancies.
            READ MORE
            GRANT IMPACT

            Number Of Lives Impacted

            344

            • 44 community doulas trained in NYC.
            • 279 moms and babies have received doula care or nutrition services.
            • 20 doulas and trainers providing care and education.
            UPDATES
            October 8, 2014
            Q&A with Chanel Porchia-Albert – Founder of Ancient Song Doula Services
            October 7, 2014
            Announcing our First Grant in New York
            October 6, 2014
            Doula 101
            CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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            grand_nepal
            DHADING & SINDHUPALCHOK, CENTRAL NEPAL
            THE APRIL 25 EARTHQUAKE AND ENSUING AFTERSHOCKS IN NEPAL LEFT OVER 8,000 PEOPLE DEAD AND THOUSANDS MORE INJURED. IN DHADING AND SINDHUPALCHOK DISTRICTS, MOST HEALTH FACILITIES WERE DESTROYED OR DEEMED UNSAFE TO WORK IN. EMC’S SPECIAL EMERGENCY GRANT TO ONE HEART WORLD-WIDE IS PROVIDING SOLAR SUITCASES FOR ELECTRICITY IN TEMPORARY CLINICS, SUPPLIES AND ESSENTIAL MEDICINES FOR SAFE PREGNANCY AND DELIVERY, AND BLANKETS AND HATS FOR MOMS AND BABIES.

            LIFETIME RISK OF DYING FROM PREGNANCY OR CHILDBIRTH RELATED CAUSES: 1 IN 200

            ONE HEART
            WORLD-WIDE
            Providing solar electricity in clinics, supplies and essential medicines for safe pregnancy and delivery, and blankets and hats for mothers and babies, via a special emergency response grant.
            GRANT AMOUNT
            $25,000 (2015)
            LEARN MORE
            BACKGROUND
            Over 1/3 of maternal deaths globally occur in crisis settings. UNFPA estimates that at least 125,000 pregnant women were impacted by the Nepal earthquake. Temporary medical clinics set up by One Heart World-Wide in concert with the government will provide essential care and a safe place for women to deliver. Later, the Solar Suitcases and other longer-term supplies supported by EMC will be used in the reconstructed health clinics.
            READ MORE
            GRANT IMPACT

            Number Of Lives Impacted

            586

            • 566 mothers and babies have received care in the tent clinics equipped with Solar Suitcases and other supplies.
            • 20 health workers have been supported in their work by the Solar Suitcases and supplies.
            UPDATES
            CHECK OUT OUR BLOG TO READ MORE ABOUT THIS GRANT

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